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    Saturday
    Oct012011

    Direct Response Copywriter on Spam and Other Meaty Issues

    When you're marketing by email, the subject line is extremely important. Here's a subject line for a recent, and totally unsolicited, email I received. 

    This email is a DIRECT response to a resume that you posted on Career Builder, THIS IS NOT SPAM!

    It IS spam and it's amateur to write 'it's not spam' when it's pure 100% spam. And I know all about spam: I live in North Carolina, the home of spam.

    Proven direct response headlines work well as subject lines...with one caveat: subject lines have to be shorter.

    But "How to" and "Five ways" and "WARNING:..." headlines work well. Subject lines that introduce stories are effective--as are topical subject lines. Many spam filters kick out emails with subject lines that include a question.

    If you want to destroy trust with the reader, include the sentence: THIS IS NOT SPAM!

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    I'm a direct response copywriter based in Charlotte, North Carolina. I specialize in providing copy and content for the direct marketing environment for clients around the world. Enter your info to the right for my free series: Seven Steps to High Converting Copy. Or contact me here.

    Thursday
    Sep292011

    Copywriter Falls Prey to the 'Bait and Switch'

    The wonderful lady who ran the local coffeshop I used to frequent is moving. She's always in a great mood and I got to know her quite well. So I went to get her a 'thank you' card today. I absolutely refuse to pay ridiculous amounts for cards (it's the thought that counts) so I went straight for the '99 cents' section in the card store.

    When I went to pay, it turned out the card cost two dollars.

    "But it was in the 99 cents section," I said. "In fact, it was right in the middle of the 99 cents section."

    "It's two dollars," repeated the sales assistant.

    The classic bait and switch. And I fell for it. In a card store run by a big company...Hallmark. I expected more.

    My local shopping center includes eight stores where I can buy cards and related 'stuff' and I'll be going to those from this point forward.

    When I tell people I'm a direct response copywriter and I detail what I do, many people think I'm in some type of 'rip off' business. A business that would use 'bait and switch' tactics.

    One of my personal copywriting rules is to be clear, truthful, and straightforward. There's NEVER a time when it's appropriate, or useful, for a competent copywriter to lie in order to convert. Plus it's not ethical.

    I'm writing to build trust and 'bait and switch' destroys trust.

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    On another note, here's a headline from my local newspaper's website.

    BOOK LOVERS AND WRITES UNITE

    Oh for an 'R' and some competent copy editing.

    I believe that grammar and spelling are extremely important for the professional direct response copywriter. Again--some readers are going to stop reading when they see a typo. Let's remember, we're in direct response to maximize response and it's our job to use every technique and tactic to achieve this goal--including solid grammar and spelling.

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    I'm a direct response copywriter based in Charlotte, North Carolina. I specialize in providing copy and content for the direct marketing environment for clients around the world. Enter your info to the right for my free series: Seven Steps to High Converting CopyOr contact me here for a direct response copywriting quote.

    Wednesday
    Sep282011

    Copywriter Looks at Beautiful Website...and Weeps

    What's the point of investing in a new website?

    This might seem like an obvious question...along the lines of 'why put gas in your car?' But very few companies know how to answer the question, 'what's the point of investing in a new website?'

    Just this afternoon, I received an email (unsolicited) from a company trumpeting the launch of their new website.

    Take a look here.

    It's beautiful and expensive (I'm certain) and the photos are professional.

    BUT...what's the point of the website?

    • To look great?
    • To enhance the brand?
    • To get great search results?

    The site is for a chain of marinas. A marina makes money by renting slips and providing boat services. A marina needs leads; it needs a database of prospects; it needs repair business...and all the marketing 'juice' it can get to generate revenue from its core business.

    Yet this gloriously produced website lacks:

    • A call to action. (DUH!)
    • Any way to opt in to a database.
    • An offer (DOUBLE DUH!)

    If you feel so moved, check the site against my direct response checklist.

    Does this company want a pretty website or does it want leads and revenue?

    I don't design and develop websites, but, as a direct response copywriter, I write copy for websites. There's only one goal of every word of my direct response copywriting: persuade readers to take the next step in the sales process. So I get a bit upset when a company spends a small fortune on a new website yet completely misses the point...or boat...

    A couple of additional notes:

    • Big Flash presence (distracting).
    • Cliché copy with no meat or CTA (shoddy).
    • I don't blame the website company but I question the marketing knowledge of the decision maker at the marina company.

    Memo to all business owners: TELL YOUR WEBSITE COMPANY YOU WANT YOUR WEBSITE TO HELP YOU MAKE MONEY.

    Apologies for getting ornery and weepy, even. In future posts, I'll focus on websites that 'get it.' Send me examples.

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    I'm a direct response copywriter based in Charlotte, North Carolina. I specialize in providing copy and content for the direct marketing environment for clients around the world. Enter your info to the right for my free series: Seven Steps to High Converting CopyOr contact me here for a direct response copywriting quote.

    Tuesday
    Sep272011

    Copywriter Questions the 'Question' Headline...continued

    Let's look at some question headlines that produced big results.

    The most famous question headline is "Are You Sick and Tired of Being Sick and Tired?"

    A quick Google search shows that other direct response copywriters certainly 'admire' this headline and you'll find variations of the formula...selling everything from bowling alleys to pizza joints.

    "Are you sick and tired of pizza that's always late?"

    "Are you sick and tired of bowlers who have shiny shirts that are too shiny?"

    A quick look through Denny Hatch's seminal tome Million Dollar Mailings shows a relative paucity of question headlines.

    A few I noted:

    "Wet Bed?"

    (A product that helps children with this problem.)

    "Got some free time? A week? A month? A summer?"

    (To get college students to volunteer for a summer internship with an environmental group.)

    "Should you be reading the most influential periodical in print?"

    (Subscription to Foreign Affairs magazine.)

    The general lack of question headlines in a book that's full of successful mailings tells us something extremely important: most serious copywriters avoid question headlines.

    In Herschell Gordon Lewis's book, Open Me Now, which is about writing copy for envelopes, he states, "questions are always reader-involving" and I agree but I would still maintain that the reader has to know the answer to the question. It's like a lawyer interviewing a witness: a competent lawyer is always going to know the answer the witness is going to provide.

    "So, Mister Jones. Did you see the defendant throw a brick through the windscreen of the Rolls Royce?"

    "Yes."

    "And is that the person you saw throwing the brick?"

    "Yes."

    Question headlines can complement and augment a strong USP. For example, a golf course I worked with in the New York City area provided a guaranteed four hour round even on a Saturday morning...when most courses in that vicinity are more funereal than the drinks trolley in coach on a 747.

    So...

    "Do you want to enjoy 18 holes in four hours--even on a Saturday?"

    YES...OF COURSE I DO!!!!

    In the Lewis book, there's an example of a mailer for a children's product with the headline...

    "Is your child ready for Muzzy?" There's a picture of a bear-like animal.

    I don't know how well it worked...perhaps the question is so bizarre that parents are almost forced to open the envelope. It turns out that Muzzy is a language learning program. But take look at this page from the website and there's a question the reader may not be able to answer--used as a subhead.

    There are so many other headline formulas that I tend to avoid question headlines and subheads. But when I use a question headline, I like to stick with the proven technique of posing a question to which the reader knows the answer--without being too obvious.

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    I'm a direct response copywriter based in Charlotte, North Carolina. I specialize in providing copy and content for the direct marketing environment for clients around the world. Enter your info to the right for my free series: Seven Steps to High Converting CopyOr contact me here for a direct response copywriting quote.

    Sunday
    Sep252011

    Copywriter Questions the 'Question' Headline

    Question headlines have always been popular in direct response copy. In this blog I want to introduce the 'classic' question headlines and also discuss a MAJOR key to the successful question headline.

    You've probably faced these question headlines.

    • The 'who else...?'

    "Who else wants six pack abs?"

    • The 'are you...?'

    "Are you looking for a vaccuum cleaner so powerful it can hold up a bowling ball?"

    In general, I'm not a big fan of the question headline. There are too many question headlines out there. I'm especially non-fond of the 'who else' as I think the writer tends to shoot his or her bolt rather too quickly.

    Remember, a headline is supposed to draw the reader into the copy.

    The 'Are you?' headline can also stop the reader, rather than encouraging the reader to keep reading. The key is to include a degree of suspense. Instead of...

    "Are you looking for new dentures?"

    I would write..."If you have dentures, are you looking for a way to eat anything, anytime--with total comfort and confidence?"

    Any type of question can be a headline.

    The most important part of a question headline: THE READER MUST ABSOLUTELY KNOW THE ANSWER TO THE QUESTION

    And it's the same with questions you pose in the body copy. Asking a question to which the reader doesn't know the answer is a rookie mistake. And yes--I've made the mistake. But no more!

    Next time you read some copy, look at the question headlines and sub-heads. Are they beckoning you into the copy?

    In the next blog, I'll swipe some excellent examples of question headlines.

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    I'm a direct response copywriter based in Charlotte, North Carolina. I specialize in providing copy and content for the direct marketing environment for clients around the world. Enter your info to the right for my free series: Seven Steps to High Converting CopyOr contact me here for a direct response copywriting quote.